Search our site 
 
Advanced Search
 
Home | Exam dates | Contact us | About us | Testimonials |
 
 

map
You are in Home >> Resources >> Clinical anaesthesia >> Acute pain


Definition of pain

Created: 31/7/2005
 

Pain

An unpleasant sensory and emotional experience associated with actual or potential tissue damage, or described in terms of such damage.

Terms used in pain (defined by International Association of the study of pain IASP)

 Allodynia
Pain due to a stimulus which does not normally provoke pain.

 Analgesia
Absence of pain in response to stimulation which would normally be painful. 
 
 Complex Regional Pain Syndrome I
CRPS I formerly known as reflex sympathetic dystrophy, consists of continuous pain (allodynia or hyperalgesia) in part of an extremity after trauma including fractures. However, the pain does not correspond to the distribution of a single peripheral nerve. The pain is worse with movement and associated with sympathetic hyperactivity. The patient often complain of cool, clammy skin which later becomes pale, cold, stiff and atrophied. This process often occurs within weeks of trauma, which may be mild. 

 Complex Regional Pain Syndrome II
CRPS 2 formerly known as causalgia, consists of burning pain in the distribution of a partially damaged peripheral nerve (most commonly median, ulnar or sciatic). Pain may occur within a month of injury and may radiate beyond the nerve’s distribution. The condition results from abnormal sweat and vasomotor sympathetic efferent pathways, possibly due to abnormal connections between efferent sympathetic fibres and somatic sensory fibres at the injury site. The skin is classically cold, moist and swollen, becoming atrophic later. 
 
 Central pain
Pain initiated or caused by a primary lesion or dysfunction in the central nervous system. 
 
 Dysaesthesia
An unpleasant abnormal sensation, whether spontaneous or evoked.

 Hyperalgesia
An increased response to a stimulus which is normally painful.

 Hyperaesthesia
Increased sensitivity to stimulation, excluding the special senses.

 Hyperpathia
A painful syndrome characterised by an abnormally painful reaction to a stimulus, especially a repetitive stimulus, as well as an increased threshold.

 Hypoalgesia
Diminished pain in response to a normally painful stimulus.

 Hypoaesthesia
Decreased sensitivity to stimulation, excluding the special senses.

 Neuralgia
Pain in the distribution of a nerve or nerves.

 Neuritis
Inflammation of a nerve or nerves.

 Neuropathic pain
Pain initiated or caused by a primary lesion or dysfunction in the nervous system.

 Neuropathy
A disturbance of function or pathological change in a nerve: in one nerve, mononeuropathy; in several nerves, mononeuropathy multiplex; if diffuse and bilateral, polyneuropathy.

 Nociceptor
A receptor preferentially sensitive to a noxious stimulus or to a stimulus which would become noxious if prolonged.

 Noxious stimulus
A noxious stimulus is one which is damaging to normal tissues.

 Pain threshold
The least experience of pain which a subject can recognise.

 Pain tolerance level
The greatest level of pain which a subject is prepared to tolerate.

 Paraesthesia
An abnormal sensation, whether spontaneous or evoked. 
 
 Peripheral neuropathic pain
Pain initiated or caused by a primary lesion or dysfunction in the peripheral nervous system.                                                    


ArticleDate:20050731
SiteSection: Article
 
   
    
                                            
  Posting rules

     To view or add comments you must be a registered user and login  




Login Status  

You are not currently logged in.
UK/Ireland Registration
Overseas Registration

  Forgot your password?








 
All rights reserved © 2019. Designed by AnaesthesiaUK.

{Site map} {Site disclaimer} {Privacy Policy} {Terms and conditions}

 Like us on Facebook 

vp