Search our site 
 
Advanced Search
 
Home | Exam dates | Contact us | About us | Testimonials |
 
 

map
Doctors vulnerable to police investigations for wilful neglect
<< Back
14th April 2015
AUK Staff
0
vote
Vote!
 
 


 ...ethical principles make clear how healthcare professionals should make the care of their patients their primary concern.
 Dr Michael Devlin
Police investigations of doctors may become more common following the introduction of the new criminal offence of wilful neglect or ill-treatment, the Medical Defence Union (MDU) has warned.

Section 20 of the Criminal Justice and Courts Act 2015 now applies in England and Wales to individuals such as doctors, dentists and nurses. It makes it "an offence for an individual who has the care of another individual by virtue of being a care worker to ill-treat or wilfully to neglect that individual."

The MDU believes there would need to be a significant or serious departure from acceptable standards for there to be an offence and the Department of Health has explained that the new offence is not designed to penalise doctors who make genuine accidents or errors. However this may not prevent a rise in the number of police investigations in cases where wilful neglect or ill-treatment is suspected.

Dr Michael Devlin, MDU head of professional standards and liaison said:

"No-one would condone any deliberate act or omission by care staff designed to harm or distress a patient. But ethical principles make clear how healthcare professionals should make the care of their patients their primary concern.

"The new legislation is likely to lead to more police investigations if there is any question that a doctor may have wilfully neglected or ill-treated a patient through something they did or didn't do. Even if a decision is later made not to prosecute the doctor, such investigations can last for months or even years and doctors may also be suspended by their employer and/or referred to the GMC.

 Good communication with patients and colleagues, including clear written instructions in the clinical records, are vital to ensure continuity of care, and may also help defend a doctor in the event of a police investigation
 Dr Michael Devlin
"Doctors will be wondering what they can do to avoid such a stressful investigation. It is vital that they tell patients if there is a significant delay in their treatment or diagnosis. Clinicians should explain to patients why the delay has happened, for example because of a waiting list, what they are doing to try to speed things up as well as ensuring the patient understands the need to get urgent medical advice if their condition worsens. Doctors should also explain to patients if any treatment will be painful for them or significantly impact on their dignity.

"Good communication with patients and colleagues, including clear written instructions in the clinical records, are vital to ensure continuity of care, and may also help defend a doctor in the event of a police investigation.

"It's important that any doctor who is informed they are involved in a police investigation doesn't panic and contacts their medical defence organisation as soon as possible."


  Posting rules

     To view or add comments you must be a registered user and login



 
All rights reserved © 2022. Designed by AnaesthesiaUK.

{Site map} {Site disclaimer} {Privacy Policy} {Terms and conditions}

 Like us on Facebook 

vp